Top Notch Personnel


In many ways, you’re better off having less than more in your manufacturing resume. While this may seem to do more harm than good, having a tight and concise resume will ensure that a recruiter or manager will see the most important details about your professional experience in the manufacturing industry.

If your resume repeats itself over and over again, the person reading it will get bored and skim over the document, decreasing your chances of being considered for the position. What you can do is make your resume leaner by leaving out these 5 things:


  1. Long Paragraphs of Text

Hiring managers or anyone reading your resume will likely gloss over parts with long paragraphs of text, not having the patience to read them all. Instead, organize your most important details into bullet points, which makes them easier to read and remember.


  1. Generic Descriptions of Your Duties

When an employer sees your position or role in your work experience, they’ll likely already know your job description. Instead, focus on your accomplishments while serving in that role, which shows how you added value to that job. Employers especially love it if you can quantify your accomplishments, so descriptions such as “Increased efficiency by 50%” are sure to get their attention.


  1. Unrelated Experiences

Unless the position or experience involves transferrable skills that can be applied to the manufacturing industry, it’s best to leave it out of your resume. Every statement and piece of information in your manufacturing resume should help the hiring manager conclude that you have the right credentials for the job.


  1. Empty and Flower Language

Words such as outstanding, interesting, and remarkable among many others only add fluff to your resume and do little to actually talk about your skills or accomplishments. Stick to the facts and let others do the praising of your work for you.


  1. Personal Information

Personal information such as your height, weight, date of birth, sex, religion, and political affiliation should have no bearing on your qualifications for a job. Employers shouldn’t make hiring decisions on this information, so go ahead and leave it out of your manufacturing resume.


Ultimately, hiring managers aren’t looking at your resume to see if you’re a nice person—that’s what the interview is for. Your manufacturing resume is where you can show your related skills to the position and industry, ideally in the most efficient manner possible. For more job search tips from a premiere staffing agency in Wichita, be sure to follow this blog. If you need help looking for specific positions, let the staffing specialists of Top Notch Personnel connect you with our pool of actively hiring employers.


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